McClung

“It is through these interactions — hearing student's stories, whether they be triumphs or challenges — I find the fulfillment of my calling,” Dean of Students Alan McClung said. “I think my most meaningful experiences involve students who have had challenges while at Lee, maybe even left for a while, but have returned as stronger, better people and then go on to success in their field and in life.”

You may have noticed a tall, mustachioed man walking through Lee’s campus, mug in hand. You might have even seen him in the Dining Hall at lunchtime, in the bleachers during intramural games or in the background at on-campus events hosted by Greek clubs.

Dean of Students Alan McClung has been at Lee since 1993, when he initially worked in the Office of Counseling and Testing. However, he has held his current role since 1995.

Many have said that McClung is not your average Dean of Students. Of course, he does handle the tough situations and disciplinary actions, but McClung is far more involved in the student body than that.

Junior English major Randyl Music said she vividly remembers the first time that she met McClung — at Lee Day the April before she came to Lee. Music was standing with her dad when McClung approached them, recognizing her father from his hall when he was a residential director.

“McClung makes his job personal, always,” said Music. “The fact that he remembers students and things about them shows students that Lee can be a family.”

Junior public relations major Ivy McCosh said McClung was one of the first faces she saw at Lee, as he was her Gateway professor. McCosh said she quickly felt at home because of his reaching out during her first semester at Lee.

“He was not just invested in my progress in his class, but he also made a genuine effort to get to know me, my goals, interests and just who I was as a person,” said McCosh.

McCosh said she always saw McClung go the extra mile for his students. She shared that she still sees McClung around campus as a junior and relayed how grateful she is for his role in her college career.

“I always feel like he is someone I can go to for advice, not just about Lee, but about life in general, and I am thankful for the way he pours into this campus and its students,” said McCosh.

McClung not only works with students on campus, but he and his wife, Trish, also lead cross-cultural trips. He explained that these opportunities are great ways to build relationships.

“Seeing the world with other people is one of the greatest privileges we are afforded,” said McClung.

But beyond traveling across the world, McClung finds that his personal interactions with students on a daily basis are what he enjoys most.

“It is through these interactions — hearing student's stories, whether they be triumphs or challenges — I find the fulfillment of my calling,” McClung said. “I think my most meaningful experiences involve students who have had challenges while at Lee, maybe even left for a while, but have returned as stronger, better people and then go on to success in their field and in life.”

Music said McClung’s passion for his job shines through as he truly embraces his role as Dean of Students.

“There’s no one quite like McClung at Lee. He is dedicated to students. He wants to see them succeed and do well. He pushed students to grow socially and spiritually, also academically,” Music said. “McClung’s investment in individual lives is the most wonderful part of [his] role at Lee. He remembers what makes various students tick and their interests, always making them [feel] seen and loved.”

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